Traditional recipes

Rye and Pomegranate Punch

Rye and Pomegranate Punch

12 (makes about 7 cups) Servings

Feel free to experiment and substitute Luxardo in other drink recipes calling for fruit liqueurs or brandy.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
  • ½ teaspoon Peychaud’s bitters
  • Freshly ground cloves (for serving)

Recipe Preparation

  • Combine rye, lemon juice, pomegranate juice, honey simple syrup, liqueur, and bitters in a punch bowl and chill until cold, about 3 hours.

  • Thirty minutes before serving, add ice cubes or ice ring (the punch tastes better slightly diluted).

  • Just before serving, add club soda and garnish with cloves. Serve over ice.

Reviews SectionWhat a great fall punch! Made this for a party and it was a huge hit.This is outstanding. I made a small batch of these at Thanksgiving they they were so well received that I made them again for a big holiday party. Absolute smash hit. I'm a complete sucker for ginger so I added some peeled chopped fresh ginger root to the pot when I made the honey simple syrup (50% honey, 50% water, maybe 3" chunk of ginger). For the holiday party I served this in a punch bowl with a bit more club soda (to lessen the alcohol content a bit!) and added an ice ring made in a Bundt cake pan with ginger ale and sliced lemons. Used Bulleit rye and used Luxardo as called for in the recipe. Cannot recommend highly enough.i_heart_oaktownOakland, CA12/11/17

From Punch (http://punchdrink.com)

Ingredients
  • 2 ounces gin
  • 3/4 ounce bay leaf syrup (see Editor's Note)
  • 3/4 ounce lime juice
  • 5 to 7 fresh basil leaves
  • soda water
  • pomegranate juice
Directions
  1. Combine all ingredients, except the soda water and pomegranate juice, in a mixing tin and shake with ice.
  2. Strain into a Hurricane or Zombie glass.
  3. Pack the glass with crushed or pebble ice.
  4. Top with a splash each of soda water, then pomegranate juice.
  5. Garnish with a bay leaf.
Editor's Note

Bay Leaf Syrup
3/4 ounces dried bay leaves
1 cup demerara sugar

Steep the dried bay leaves in 1 cup of boiling water for 10 minutes. Strain the mixture to remove bay leaves and add in the sugar. Stir to dissolve, and bottle.


Hojoko’s Ward Eight

Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 ounces bourbon, preferably Larceny or Weller 107
  • OR 1 1/2 ounces rye whiskey, preferably Rittenhouse
  • 1/2 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce Hojoko grenadine (see Editor's Note)
  • 1/4 ounce orange juice
  • 1/4 ounce Hojoko lime cordial (see Editor's Note)
  • 2 dashes orange bitters
Directions
  1. Combine ingredients in cocktail shaker with ice.
  2. Shake and strain into chilled cocktail glass.
Editor's Note

Grenadine:
500g white sugar
17 3/4 ounces pomegranate juice
5 1/3 ounces pomegranate molasses
12 drops of orange blossom water

Dissolve sugar in juice. Add molasses, and fine strain. Add blossom water, and bottle.

Lime Cordial:
500g of spent lime shells (what is left over after making lime juice)
500g sugar
14 ounces lime juice
3 1/2 ounces sudachi juice
1/2 ounce seasoned rice wine vinegar
1 tbsp tamari
5 ounces 80-proof neutral spirit

Allow the sugar to sit on the lime shells for 12 hours. Add lime juice, sudachi juice, seasoned rice wine vinegar, tamari and neutral spirit. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Fine strain, and bottle.


What to Make With Rye Whiskey: 23 Delicious Cocktails

If I'm having whiskey, my first choice is rye. I love its spicy flavor and the way it cuts through a drink, whether you're working with budget bottles (I'm partial to Redemption) or fancier options.

I also love that rye cocktails can be as simple or as complex as you like—just dress it up with sugar and bitters, or mix in all sorts of liqueurs, aromatized wines, and fresh juices. Got a bottle of rye and wondering how to use it? Keep reading for 23 of our favorite cocktails, including both simple classics, like the Old Fashioned and the Manhattan, and drinks made with less common ingredients, like cacao nibs, chicory, or even balsamic vinegar. (Of course, we also have you covered if you want some other whiskey drink recipes.)

Old Fashioned Cocktails for a Crowd

My favorite cocktail of all time is also one of the simplest. At its core, an Old Fashioned is just whiskey (bourbon works, but I like it with rye) with a little sweetener and a few dashes of Angostura bitters. Making a big-batch version for a party is super easy—rather than stirring each drink, you'll add a little water to the bottle to dilute the whole recipe, then chill it.

Salted Roasted Peanut Old Fashioned in a Bottle

Inspired by ballpark peanuts, this fancy Old Fashioned is made with peanut-infused rye and just a touch of salt. Don't be intimidated by the infusion—it only takes about 24 hours. Packaging the cocktail in soda bottles (as opposed to just making it in a pitcher) doesn't really change the flavor, but you'll look pretty cool showing up to a party with a six-pack of hand-bottled cocktails.

Manhattan Cocktails for a Crowd

If you like spirituous drinks, but you want something a little softer than an Old Fashioned, a classic Manhattan will do the trick. Rye's spice is amplified with Angostura bitters, and high-quality sweet vermouth adds juicy berry notes. Note: If your bottle of vermouth is more than a month old, toss it and start fresh.

The Brooklyn Cocktail

This Manhattan variation keeps the 2:1 ratio of rye and vermouth, but swaps sweet vermouth for dry and compensates with a little maraschino liqueur and Amer Picon, a French aperitif. Can't find the Picon? Try a sweeter-style Italian amaro, like Ramazzotti, or just shake in some extra bitters.

Boulevardier

The Negroni, made with equal parts gin, sweet vermouth, and Campari, is very popular these days. I get the appeal, but to be honest, it's a little much for me. I prefer the Boulevardier, which replaces the gin with spicy rye—a single substitution that makes a huge difference, giving the drink a rich complexity.

Vieux Carré

The Vieux Carré, named after the French Quarter, is one of the signature drinks of New Orleans. It's a strong cocktail, based on equal parts rye, cognac, and sweet vermouth. The drink is spiced with Angostura and Peychaud's Bitters, and smoothed out with herbal, honeyed Bénédictine.

Sazerac

You can't talk New Orleans cocktails without mentioning the Sazerac, a boozy drink that's heavy on the rye, with a few dashes of Peychaud's Bitters. The most important part: a rinse of Herbsaint, an anise liqueur, or a similarly flavored option like Pernod or absinthe.

Dreams Never End

We love rye for its bite, but sometimes you want to soften it up a bit. This cocktail starts with rye, then gets depth from Carpano Antica and sweetness from a homemade pear syrup. Just a barspoon of Fernet Branca gives the drink an herbal note that plays well with the sweet-spicy flavors.

Toronto Cocktail

Speaking of Fernet: You may have heard that bartenders will drink it by the shot, which became something of a fad a while back, perhaps as a way of proving how tough they were or to scare away outsiders. Fernet is intense stuff, bitter and herbal, cardamom-y and minty. If you're not ready to down an ounce straight up, try balancing it out with rye and sugar. You end up with a rich, not-too-bitter cocktail.

Cynar Toronto

If the Toronto is still too strong for you, this variation is a good place to start. Cynar (pronounced chee-NAHR) is a bittersweet and vegetal Italian digestivo. Its bracing flavor makes it a good substitute for Fernet, but it's a bit less aggressive, and delicious with a little whiskey.

The Chocolate Rye

For this cocktail, we infuse rye with all the flavors you'd find in a box of assorted chocolates: cacao nibs, ginger, cinnamon, and more. The infused whiskey gets mixed with nutty oloroso sherry the sweet, rich syrup from a jar of Luxardo cherries and floral, not-too-tart Meyer lemon juice. It's the perfect after-dinner sipper.

Get the recipe for The Chocolate Rye »

Up to Date

Despite the name, this cocktail is actually about a century old. It combines equal parts rye and sherry with a little orangey Grand Marnier and a couple of dashes of Angostura bitters. When it comes to the sherry, you have options—Fino or Manzanilla will make the drink lighter and drier, while Amontillado or oloroso will give you a more Manhattan-like richness.

Get the recipe for the Up to Date »

Southern Baptist

A lot of whiskey drinks tend toward the deep and boozy, but this one is bright and tart, highlighting the spiciness of good rye. The whiskey is mixed with an assertive ginger syrup, and tart lime juice makes the whole thing refreshing.

Buena Vista Fizz

Think of this cocktail as a spin on breakfast, including the coffee and citrus. The drink starts with equal parts Jameson and a chicory-infused rye, then adds a flavorful espresso syrup, lemon juice, and orange juice. We won't judge if you start early and drink 'em all morning.

New Brunswick

This fruity cocktail pairs tart pink grapefruit juice with overproof rye and sweet Lillet Rouge or Carpano Antica (the latter adds a richness to the drink that we especially like). With a little lemon juice and a few dashes of grapefruit bitters, this drink is as much about celebrating citrus as it is about the whiskey.

New Friend

Swapping out a Boulevardier's sweet vermouth for dry vermouth gives you an Old Pal. It's a good drink, but an intense one. For something that's more of a crowd-pleaser, try the New Friend, a variation that replaces the Campari with juicy Aperol and the vermouth with crisp, slightly bitter Cocchi Americano.

New York Shrub

Balsamic vinegar might sound like an odd cocktail ingredient, but it pairs wonderfully with whiskey. For this drink, we reduce it into a thick, tangy syrup, then shake it with rye, lemon juice, and simple syrup. Don't feel the need to break out the fancy balsamic here—a decent under-$10 bottle works just fine.

Mott and Mulberry

If you've never had Amaro Abano, think of its mentholated, clove-heavy flavor as sitting somewhere between Averna and Fernet. Mixed with apple cider and rye, it makes for the ultimate spiced cider. The cocktail is brightened up with lemon juice and gets a rich sweetness from a simple syrup made with Demerara sugar.

Millionaire Cocktail

Adding egg white to a shaken cocktail gives it thick, frothy body. It works especially well with this rye cocktail, made rich with Grand Marnier and grenadine. The mellow whiskey flavors are rounded out by a sweet fruitiness, and a few dashes of absinthe contribute just a hint of anise flavor.

Hot Ward 8 Cocktail

A regular Ward 8 is made with lemon and orange juices, but for this steaming-hot version, we use an oleo-saccharum—a syrup made by muddling lemon and orange peels with sugar. It's intensely citrusy, which is perfect for standing up to a mixture of rye, tangy pomegranate juice, curaçao, and bitters.

Orchard Boulevardier

Of course, you can always just pour some whiskey in your cider, but this combination is far better. It's a spin on the Boulevardier, with a little extra rye to punch through the mix of hot cider, bracing Campari, and sweet vermouth.

Frisco Sour

You might be surprised at how easy it is to find Bénédictine—the herbal, honey-laced, slightly musky liqueur that's wonderful with brown spirits—in today's cocktails. This drink requires it, and not much else: It's just rye, Bénédictine, and fresh lemon.

Filibuster

The Filibuster is basically a whiskey sour, with maple syrup adding a nice woodsy sweetness. A little Angostura on top adds a cinnamony-spicy scent.


Ingredients

  • For the Oleo-Saccharum:
  • Zest from 2 lemons
  • Zest from 1 orange
  • 4 1/2 ounces (130g) sugar
  • For the Cocktails:
  • 8 ounces (235ml) boiling water, plus more for preheating thermos
  • 16 ounces (475ml) rye whiskey, such as Bulleit 95
  • 4 ounces (120ml) unsweetened pomegranate juice
  • 2 ounces (60ml) dry orange curaçao, such as Pierre Ferrand
  • 8 dashes Angostura bitters
  • 8 lemon zest strips, for garnish (optional)

13 holiday punch recipes to practice NOW

Punch is the most social of all drinks, and it is a tradition to share this tasty beverage during a time of celebration. Here are 13 festive punch recipes that you can practice now, and by holiday season you’ll be a hosting pro. crimson bulleit punch Treat your guests this&hellip

Published on October 20, 2015

Punch is the most social of all drinks, and it is a tradition to share this tasty beverage during a time of celebration. Here are 13 festive punch recipes that you can practice now, and by holiday season you’ll be a hosting pro.


Holiday Cocktails

Looking for inspiration for your holiday cheer? Here is our list of favorites. Enjoy!

Pomegranate Party Punch

1/2 cup simple syrup
1 750 ml bottle sparkling wine
1/2 cup white rum
3/4 cup pomegranate juice
1 lemon, thinly sliced
Pomegranate seeds for garnish

Combine all ingredients in a punch bowl. Add ice, serve cold. For a festive ice ring, place pomegranate seeds in a bundt pan, fill half way with water and freeze.

Cocoa Cheer

1 ounce vodka
1 ounce half & half
1/2 ounce grenadine
1/2 ounce white chocolate syrup
4 ounces prepared Equal Exchange Organic Hot Cocoa

Prepare hot chocolate in pan on stove as per package instructions. Add other ingredients, heat gently (do not simmer). Pour into mug, top with whipped cream and marachino cherry. For multiple servings, multiply ingredients and keep warm in a crock pot.

Cranberry Martini

2 ounces vodka
1/2 ounce orange liquer
2 1/2 ounces unsweetened cranberry juice
Coarse-grind sugar
Fresh cranberries

Fill cocktail shaker with ice, add liquid ingredients. Shake about 30 seconds. Strain into martini glass rimmed with sugar. Add three cranberries.

Mojito

6 mint leaves, plus 1 sprig
3/4 ounce simple syrup
3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
1 1/2 ounces white rum
1 1/2 ounces club soda
Lightly muddle (crush) mint leaves in a cocktail shaker. Add simple syrup, lime juice and rum, and fill with ice. Shake well and pour unstrained into a Highball glass. Top with club soda and garnish with mint sprig or slice of lime.

Classic Manhattan

2 ounces rye whiskey
3/4 ounce sweet vermouth
2 dashes aromatic bitters
Serve stirred, never shaken. Kiss with cherry.

Sidecar

1 1/2 ounces cognac
3/4 ounce Cointreau
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
Rub rim of a chilled cocktail glass with lemon, dip in sugar. Shake above ingredients with ice. Strain into glass, and garnish with slice of lemon.


Ward Eight

The Ward Eight, a turn-of-the-20th century concoction, is one of Boston’s major contributions to craft cocktails. The cocktail was reportedly created in 1898 in Boston to celebrate the election of one Martin M. Lomasney to the state legislature. Lomasney was a politician who wielded considerable power in Boston for 40 years, serving as a state senator and representative as well as a political “boss” in the city’s eighth ward.

The drink, by all accounts, was created at the Locke-Ober Café in Boston’s eighth ward. Already nearly 20 years old when the drink was created there, the venerable French restaurant and bar survived until 2012, when it finally closed. As with any drink that old that wasn’t written down at the time, there are different approaches to crafting it, but the most popular is a mix of rye whiskey, lemon and orange juices and grenadine, which is what author and cocktail historian David Wondrich specifies in his rendition here.

Some stories describe the creation of the Ward Eight as happening before Lomasney officially won his election, so sure was the bar staff that he would do so. Many stories abound about the questionable nature as to his victory, including tales of him handing out pre-filled ballots to voters entering the polls. Regardless of would-be shifty dealings, the man was a popular politician.

Essentially a riff on a rye Whiskey Sour, the Ward Eight sees some of the lemon juice substituted with orange, and simple syrup is replaced by grenadine. For decades, Rose’s grenadine dominated the market, with most people associating the pomegranate-flavored bar syrup with a cloying concoction of corn syrup and artificial flavors and colors. Today, as in much of the bar world, there are options, including a number of grenadine brands made with real fruit juice. However, for those who can’t find a favorite bottle on the shelves, or those who are feeling DIY-y, you can make your own homemade grenadine either with freshly juiced pomegranates or store-bought juice.

The Ward Eight calls for a mere two teaspoons of the sweet-tart pomegranate syrup. Adding vodka to the grenadine keeps it shelf-stable for much longer, but for those who want to use it quickly, there’s always the Jack Rose, the Tequila Sunrise and the Shirley Temple. Just be sure not to use a vodka-infused version if making a Shirley Temple or one of its non-alcoholic variations.


Holiday Cocktails

Looking for inspiration for your holiday cheer? Here is our list of favorites. Enjoy!

Pomegranate Party Punch

1/2 cup simple syrup
1 750 ml bottle sparkling wine
1/2 cup white rum
3/4 cup pomegranate juice
1 lemon, thinly sliced
Pomegranate seeds for garnish

Combine all ingredients in a punch bowl. Add ice, serve cold. For a festive ice ring, place pomegranate seeds in a bundt pan, fill half way with water and freeze.

Cocoa Cheer

1 ounce vodka
1 ounce half & half
1/2 ounce grenadine
1/2 ounce white chocolate syrup
4 ounces prepared Equal Exchange Organic Hot Cocoa

Prepare hot chocolate in pan on stove as per package instructions. Add other ingredients, heat gently (do not simmer). Pour into mug, top with whipped cream and marachino cherry. For multiple servings, multiply ingredients and keep warm in a crock pot.

Cranberry Martini

2 ounces vodka
1/2 ounce orange liquer
2 1/2 ounces unsweetened cranberry juice
Coarse-grind sugar
Fresh cranberries

Fill cocktail shaker with ice, add liquid ingredients. Shake about 30 seconds. Strain into martini glass rimmed with sugar. Add three cranberries.

Mojito

6 mint leaves, plus 1 sprig
3/4 ounce simple syrup
3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
1 1/2 ounces white rum
1 1/2 ounces club soda
Lightly muddle (crush) mint leaves in a cocktail shaker. Add simple syrup, lime juice and rum, and fill with ice. Shake well and pour unstrained into a Highball glass. Top with club soda and garnish with mint sprig or slice of lime.

Classic Manhattan

2 ounces rye whiskey
3/4 ounce sweet vermouth
2 dashes aromatic bitters
Serve stirred, never shaken. Kiss with cherry.

Sidecar

1 1/2 ounces cognac
3/4 ounce Cointreau
3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
Rub rim of a chilled cocktail glass with lemon, dip in sugar. Shake above ingredients with ice. Strain into glass, and garnish with slice of lemon.


Orgeat Cocktails

The Casper. | Photo by Natascha Moustache. Charo's Kick. | Photo by Michael Tulipan. The Chestnut Cup. | Photo by Dylan + Jeni. College Radio. | Photo by Lara Ferroni. Coronado Luau Special. | Photo by Arlene Ibarra. Daiquiri D'Ananas. | Photo by Natalie Jacobs. Early Start. | Photo by Max Kelly. Fog Cutter. | Photo by Clayton Hauck. Hazy Jane. | Photo by AJ Meeker & Ashley Marti. Improved Japanese Cocktail. Jungle Booby. | Photo by Noah Fecks. Pandanime. | Photo by Julie Soefer. Polynesian Remedy. | Photo by Caleb Krivoshey. Saturn Cocktail. | Photo by Nick Vorderman. The Scorpion Reef. | Photo by Sam Bennett. Strange Weaver. | Photo courtesy of Beretta. Surf Liner. | Photo by Gabe Fonseca. Tequila for Christmas. | Photo by Emma Janzen. Trinidad Sour. | Photo by Justin Stidham. Whiskey Daisy.

Orgeat may be best known as a staple of tiki cocktails, but it&rsquos an incredibly versatile ingredient. Whether it&rsquos used to bring a layer of nuttiness to whiskey drinks or complement the earthiness of mezcal and tequila, orgeat excels at its ability to lend creamy balance to cocktails. Here are 20 ways to put your next homemade batch or store-bought bottle to use. For commercial orgeat, try Giffard, Small Hand Foods or BG Reynolds, but be aware that some of these recipes call for DIY orgeat, so check out this recipe for classic orgeat our this recipe for pistachio orgeat if you want to experiment a bit more.

The Casper Reposado tequila meets homemade hazelnut orgeat and citrus.

Charo&rsquos Kick Orgeat lends a cooling nutty quality to this agave spirits-based cocktail.

The Chestnut Cup The richness of orgeat meets the bright bitterness of Campari and lemon in this drink.

College Radio A simple mix of bourbon, orange juice and orgeat goes through the blender.

Coronado Luau Special A tiki drink that originally appeared on the menu at the Luau Room at the Hotel Del Coronado.

Daiquiri D&rsquoAnanas Earthy rhum agricole pairs perfectly with a sweet, juicy pineapple liqueur.

Early Start At Better Luck Tomorrow, aquavit and sorrel find balance thanks to orgeat.

Fog Cutter How they make the classic tiki drink at Lost Lake in Chicago.

Hazy Jane Vodka and yogurt meet orgeat, lemon and cucumber in this creamy number from Portland.

Improved Japanese Cocktail Brandy, orgeat, lemon and Peychaud&rsquos bitters make up the Improved Japanese cocktail.

Jungle Booby Tequila stars in this Jungle Bird variation, which also welcomes grapefruit and orgeat to the mix.

Pandanime Orgeat helps balance heavy cream and pandan with the spirited punch of rum and apple brandy.

Polynesian Remedy This riff on the Penicillin replaces whisky with rum and adds a little orgeat to the mix.

Saturn Cocktail A classic gin-based tiki drink.

Scorpion Reef A recipe inspired by the flavors of pineapple flan.

Strange Weaver A tropical Negroni riff from San Francisco.

Surf Liner Pineapple and orgeat give this rye cocktail a tropical bent.

Tequila for Christmas Devised for the holidays but delicious year-round, this tequila cocktail also includes pomegranate and orgeat.

Trinidad Sour Orgeat softens a hefty dose of Angostura bitters in this modern classic.

Whiskey Daisy Two kinds of whiskey combine with lemon and orgeat in this take on the 19th Century cocktail.