Traditional recipes

Chicken and bacon crisp topper recipe

Chicken and bacon crisp topper recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Poultry
  • Chicken
  • Chicken pasta
  • Chicken pasta bakes

This is a dish I had some years ago which I've tried to emulate here. I've had some degree of success, but suffice to say, it was a different taste altogether. Hope you enjoy!


Tyne and Wear, England, UK

13 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 200g penne pasta (or other)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2 peppers, chopped (1 red, 1 yellow)
  • oil as needed
  • 400g chicken breast fillet, cubed
  • 200g bacon, fat removed, diced
  • 200g sliced mushrooms
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 150ml milk
  • 30g butter
  • 30g plain flour
  • 300ml chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon tomato puree
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar
  • 3 packets decent cheese and onion crisps
  • 300ml single cream
  • 80g cheese (red Leicester or other)

MethodPrep:30min ›Cook:40min ›Ready in:1hr10min

  1. Preheat the oven to 190 C / Gas 5.
  2. Bring some water to the boil, add the pasta, bring back to the boil and simmer for 8 to 10 minutes.
  3. Fry the onion and peppers in oil for 5 to 10 minutes, then add the chicken and bacon and cook for a further 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms and all the spices and leave to simmer for 10 minutes.
  4. Heat the milk but do not boil. In a separate saucepan, melt the butter before taking off the heat and stirring in the flour. Return to the heat before adding the heated milk, stirring continuously until it has a thick consistency. Add the stock, tomato puree and sugar, and stir over the heat until mixed in.
  5. In a separate container, mix the pasta, the contents of the frying pan, and the roux sauce together well. Transfer to a casserole dish.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven until heated through, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove 5 minutes before the end and crumble the crisps over the top, pour over the single cream, and sprinkle with the grated cheese before returning to the oven.

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)

Reviews in English (1)

A filling dish!-06 Mar 2012


Recipe Summary

  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 11⁄2 lb.)
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1 frozen puff pastry sheet, thawed (1⁄2 of 17.3-oz. pkg.)
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 12 parsley leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 (6-oz.) packages steam-in-bag fresh English peas or 3 cups frozen English peas
  • 4 bacon slices
  • 3 tablespoons salted butter
  • 1 cup chopped Vidalia or other sweet onion (from 1 medium onion)
  • 1/2 cup cup (1⁄4-inch) diagonally sliced celery (from 1 large stalk)
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 2 ounces fontina cheese, shredded (about 1⁄2 cup)

Preheat oven to 400°F. Place chicken, stock, and 1⁄2 teaspoon of the salt in a large saucepan bring to a boil over high. Reduce heat to medium-low cover and cook until chicken is cooked through, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat, and let stand about 20 minutes. Remove chicken from stock, reserving 2 1⁄2 cups of the stock. Coarsely shred chicken.

Meanwhile, place puff pastry sheet on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cut pastry sheet into 4 squares separate squares. Brush squares lightly with egg top each square with 3 parsley leaves, pressing gently to adhere. Sprinkle with pepper. Bake on oven rack in bottom third of preheated oven until dough is puffed and golden brown, 12 to 14 minutes.

Cook peas according to package directions keep warm.

Cook bacon in a large skillet over medium-high until crisp, about 6 minutes. Remove bacon to a paper towel-lined plate, reserving drippings in skillet crumble bacon. Add butter to hot drippings in skillet, and cook over medium until butter melts, about 1 minute. Add onion and celery cook, stirring often, until onion is tender and celery is tender-crisp, about 8 minutes. Add flour, and cook, stirring constantly, about 1 minute. Stir in cream and reserved 2 1⁄2 cups stock bring to a simmer, stirring often. Stir in peas, cheese, chicken, bacon, and remaining 1⁄2 teaspoon salt reduce heat to medium-low, and cook until mixture is thickened andthoroughly heated, about 10 minutes.

Divide mixture among 4 shallow bowls, and top each with a puff pastry square. Serve immediately.


33 Best Bacon Recipes Ever

They say that bacon makes everything better. Not only is that not true—bacon jello? gross!—the high-calorie strips of greasy meat can seriously derail your healthy diet. But we'll admit that it's hard to turn down a bite of bacon when you're in the mood for that savory taste. With that in mind, we pulled together our favorite healthy bacon recipes. From clam chowder to pizza, there's something on this list for everyone.

See which delicious recipe you'll want to try first, and be sure to select center-cut bacon—it's a better choice than most sodium-drenched turkey bacon. Just be sure to avoid these 20 Bacon Mistakes.


Chicken Marsala in Oven

Chicken Marsala is a great dish to fix because it involves oven baking. This is a bonus because cooks can just leave their chicken in the oven while taking care of other things. They don’t need to tend to it very often. Just pull it out of the oven and it’s done!

But on the downside, chicken can easily become dried out in the oven. Here are some tips that you can use to keep your oven baked chicken nice and moist.

  • Don’t Overcook It: Overcooked chicken will be tough and dry. Bake until the internal temperature reaches about 160 degrees. Then let it sit under foil to ensure it maintains that temperature.
  • Try Bone In Chicken Breast: These tend to be juicier than boneless chicken breasts.
  • Cook at Lower Heat for Longer: This will keep chicken breasts tender and juicy.
  • Let it Rest: Let the cooked chicken rest at room temperature for 3-5 minutes after baking it. This will help to hold in more of the juices.
  • Use Olive Oil: This will keep the chicken moist while adding flavor.

This chicken Marsala recipe is the perfect choice for an elegant meal at home. It is made with deliciously coated chicken breasts covered in a Marsala wine and mushroom sauce.

The recipe calls for pancetta, which many chicken Marsala recipes omit. Pancetta is an Italian bacon that is cured with salt, pepper, and other spices, but not smoked. It’s moister and has a mellower flavor than most bacon. You can find it in any good Italian market and many supermarkets, it’s definitely worth the extra effort to get.

Some cooks may want to substitute the pancetta, but we caution against it. You can substitute bacon for pancetta by blanching it in boiling water first to subdue the smoky flavor. However, according to OChef, “your friends will mock you and your self-esteem will suffer”. We agree. It’s what helps to make this recipe incredibly magnificent. Settle for nothing less.

Follow this recipe to make a meal your friends and family will not soon forget.

If you enjoyed this recipe, make sure to check out our Apple-Pork Chops Recipe and our Baked Parmesan Chicken Recipe.

heart solid heart solid icon


What’s Better Than Chicken Stew? Chicken Stew Topped With Crispy Chicken Skin

No one has ever given me an award for my ability to plan ahead. Because I’m terrible at it. But here’s the thing: I love the singular benefits of cooking low and slow. The plush, fall-apart-ability of meat that’s stewed for hours the deep, silken texture of broth that’s bathed with bones overnight. The Instant Pot is great and all, but for me it’s never quite captured the full amplitude of a slow-cooked-thing, try as I might to cut corners.

A person with more sense than I would probably come to a simple conclusion here: Make these foods when you, like, have time. On a Sunday. Or a sick day. Or a “rejuvenation leave,” a real thing according to a press release we recently received. But I’ve never gotten an award for being sensible either. And that is how I found myself tearing through my local Key Foods at 7 p.m. on a Tuesday like a contestant on Supermarket Sweep, hurling packages of organic skin-on bone-in chicken thighs into my bag with no explanation beyond a very specific craving for hearty, slow-cooked, made-at-home stew. Specifically, this Slow-Cooked Chicken Stew with Kale, a new autumn centerpiece built to warm the tummies and stick to the bones of up to eight people (or two, many times over), topped with a quartet of crunchy and acidic mix-n-match toppings to complement its richness.

7:34 p.m. Remember how I texted you earlier that I was making slow-cooked chicken stew for dinner and how excited you were? I say to significant-O Rob, who has just returned from work and informed me he is very tired and very hungry. Well, we’re starting now. He gives me a long dead-eyed stare. I pour him a large glass of wine and relinquish Spotify rights, then give him an onion to chop.

7:49 p.m. Rob fries a tangle of bacon in a pot on the stove 'til it’s crispy and smells very nice. I salt and pepper eight gleaming chicken thighs to perfection, then turn my back for one moment (okay, maybe five moments). When I return, my sons who are cats have licked what appears to be every single piece of chicken, and are team-dragging one thigh across the table back to their lair behind the stairs. They do not seem sorry.

8:13 p.m. Chicken thighs are crackling in a shallow pool of bacon fat. Hot bacon fat burns off cat saliva, right?

8:40 p.m. You know what's impossible not to prematurely snack on? Chicken skin that’s been fried in bacon fat then removed and baked real crispy. The key to this recipe is not just what’s in the stew it’s what goes on top: fried chicken skin chopped and tossed with grated garlic, salt, pepper, and lemon zest. Kind of like a zingy chicharron situation. I eat about half of it while Rob isn’t looking, then blame its absence on the cats.

8:51 p.m. Now-skinless chicken thighs are simmering with water, shallots, garlic, parsley, bay leaves, and bacon. The recipe says this step will take an hour to an hour-and-a-half to complete, so Rob cranks up his Miami Vice-themed playlist to drown out the sound of our stomachs growling and we settle in to polish off the rest of the wine.

9:32 p.m. The stew is still simmering. "A watched pot doesn't boil!" I say helpfully to Rob, who is cursing the day we met. I prepare stew topper number two, homemade lemon oil, by thinly slicing a lemon into quartered rounds and submerging it in a small bowl of olive oil with a pinch of sugar, salt, and pep.

10:08 p.m. We remove the chicken thighs from the broth and let them cool for about ten minutes, then pull tender meat from the bones and tear it into bite-sized pieces. The bones go back into the pot, so we may glean from their marrow every last bit of fatty, flavorful goodness.

10:27 p.m. Curly kale balances out fatty goodness, so we dump eight cups of it into the bubbling cauldron. They turn bright green and immediately shrink into the broth. Magic! Then the stew comes off the heat and the meat goes back in.

10:39 p.m. Suddenly, I notice a small recipe direction I did not notice before: for best results, this stew is supposed to sit and chill for 12 hours (bones and all) before we eat it. (Colleague Sarah Jampel, who could and probably has won many Planning Ahead awards in her lifetime, on Slack the next day: “Reading the recipe all the way through before you make it is the No. 1 recipe rule!” Thanks, Jampel.) But this kitchen smells too good and my stomach is growling too loudly and Rob is too close to calling off our wedding to not eat this stew right this very second. So, we carefully fish out the bones and put them in Tupperware. I’ll put them back later and pretend this didn’t happen.

10:55 p.m. Out come the bowls and the spoons and the toppers: crispy-crunchy chicken skin gremolata, lemon oil, sliced radishes, and red onions. One by one I spoon them onto the stew, surface slick and studded with silk-soft mounds of chicken, green swirls of kale, and bits of bacon. The crunch of the toppings plays like a jazzy little song off the unctuous broth. One-dish dinner: complete!

11:23 p.m. After we’ve scarfed down all we can I plop the bones back into the pot, cover it, stick it in the fridge and collapse into bed.

THE NEXT DAY: I wake up ready for—what else?—more stew. The recipe is correct: chilling for hours has dramatically improved the flavor. (Hot tip: Scrape off about half of the superfluous fat that has risen to the top, both for the sake of your heart health and to brighten up the flavor of the broth.) It was all worth it. I bring my stew to work along with a tupperware full o’ toppings for the least sad desk lunch OF ALL TIME! Stew for lunch! Stew for supper! Stew for breakfast! Stew forever.


There’s no better way to gussy up greens than to add beautifully charred roasted vegetables. Toss chunks of sweet potato or carrot in olive oil and then roast them on a sheet pan in the oven until they’re softened and slightly crisp at the edges. Then, top greens with grilled chicken, tomatoes, fresh green beans, and the roasted vegetables before drizzling the salad with your favorite vinaigrette.


How to Make Tomato Bisque:

To start the flavor base, crisp up a few slices of chopped bacon in a large soup pot:

The bacon fat gives a nice flavor to the soup, and the crispy bacon makes for a great soup topper when we serve it later.

Remove the bacon bits from the pan with a slotted spoon, leaving the bacon fat behind.

Then add chopped celery, chopped onion, butter, and a pinch of salt:

Saute the vegetables for about 5 minutes, until softened, then add all-purpose flour:

Stir the flour in with the vegetables for about a minute, until smooth, to make a roux. This will thicken our soup later on.

Next, add canned diced tomatoes, chicken stock, a bay leaf, and some freshly cracked black pepper to the pot:

Simmer the soup for about 15 minutes, covered, then add heavy cream:

Stir that through, then taste for seasoning. Usually I add a little more salt at this point.

Let the soup cool slightly, then blend in batches, until creamy and smooth:

I like to pair the soup with a gruyere grilled cheese sandwich, or with crumbled bacon, croutons, and creme fraiche:

The full recipe and a video are both below.


  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 cup thinly sliced celery
  • ½ cup thinly sliced carrot
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups fat-free milk
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 cups frozen whole kernel corn, thawed
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme or 1/2 tsp. dried thyme, crushed
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 slices lower sodium, less fat bacon, crisp-cooked and crumbled (Optional)

In a 4-qt. Dutch oven melt butter over medium. Add the next five ingredients (through salt) cook 10 minutes or until vegetables are softened, stirring occasionally. If desired, remove about 1/2 cup of the vegetables to use as a topper. Stir flour into the remaining vegetables. Cook and stir 1 minute more.

Gradually whisk in milk and broth. Stir in corn, thyme, and bay leaves. Bring to boiling reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat cool 10 minutes.

Remove and discard thyme sprigs and bay leaves. Using an immersion blender, blend soup until smooth. (Or working in batches, transfer soup to a blender cover and blend until smooth. Return all of the soup to Dutch oven.) Heat through. Top servings with the reserved vegetables, crumbled bacon, and if desired, black pepper.


Chicken, bacon and mushroom pie

Why do we love pies? Few things are a comforting a hot pie with flaky or crumbly pastry and a piping hot filling. In this recipe, Victoria pays homage to the humble pie - or in fact not so humble pie.

Related recipes

Related recipes

Hide story show story

Few things in life cannot be improved by the addition of pastry. Buttery, flaky and crisp on the outside, with a hint of delicious goo from where it’s slurped up a bit juice from the filling, a really good pie can stun a whole table into silence.

I’ve got no beef with a lemon meringue or apple pie - in fact I think they’re wonderful - but for my money, the best pies are always meat pies. Oozing with savoury gravy and served with a generous dollop of mash, a meat pie is comfort food at its best.

When I was a child, I’d always go for good old-fashioned steak and kidney, even though I thought kidneys were revolting. I recognised, even then, that the kidney brought something extra to the flavour table and gave the gravy a special depth that couldn’t come from steak alone. I relished in the sense of danger that not quite knowing what was on the end of my fork could bring - like Russian roulette in pie form. Who says you shouldn’t play with your food?

Nowadays, I’m still a big fan of steak and kidney (and I’ll eat the kidney without so much as a wince in sight) or any other steak-based pie. It would be hard to go far wrong with steak and Guinness, steak and ale or steak in red wine, but (wo)man can’t live on steak alone.

This chicken, bacon and mushroom pie ticks all the right boxes for me. Intense savoury, meaty flavour, enough sauce for the mash to soak up and that perfect combination of crispy pastry on the outside, with a little bit of gravy-soaked goodness on the inside. I love a puff top, but flaky or short would work well too. You shouldn’t be scared to make your own puff pastry every now and then - it really is so much easier than everyone tries to make out. But, on days when you have better things to do, shop bought is almost as good as homemade, just make sure you pick up a pack that say “all butter”.


Bring Home the (Plant-Based) Bacon

iStock.com/Elisaveta Ivanova

Bacon is hugely popular, but it comes with a heaping side of animal cruelty, harmful environmental effects, and health concerns. Luckily, you can still enjoy similar versatility and deliciousness with vegan and plant-based versions. There are many plant-based foods that you can turn into bacon alternatives. So have fun and enjoy the recipes!


Watch the video: φιλέτο κοτόπουλο τυλιγμένο με μπέικον (January 2022).